Front cover shows two green dinosaurs happily jumping on a pile of cars

Dinosaurs and All That Rubbish – a book about appreciating the world

I’m a bit of an environmentalist. I love volunteering with conservation charities and pretty much idolise The Eden Project. I try to minimise the resources I use by fixing things. And instead of buying things new, reusing what I have or buying from charity shops. Maybe this is why Dinosaurs and All That Rubbish resonated so strongly with me. I think I was probably about 5 years old when my mum first read it to me. I can still remember how I felt about the story, which is why, 20 years later, I am now sharing it with you 🙂

The story, written by Michael Foreman, is about a man who wants to reach a star, so he builds a rocket to get him there. Unfortunately this pollutes the Earth and covers the planet in rubbish.  This, however, wakes up the dinosaurs from under the Earth, who then clear the planet of all the rubbish.  When the man returns he finds the dinosaurs and they teach him a very important lesson about the planet.

These are the top 5 reasons I love the book and the lessons it has taught me.

1 It teaches you to appreciate what you have

A lot of reasons why people are unhappy today is that, like the man in the book, they don’t see the good things that are around them. So instead they search for something that never quite makes them as happy as they want to be. Learning to be thankful for the things you have is a great skill to set your child up for a happier life. And one that is even more important in adulthood.

Dinosaurs, apes, mammoths and birds all celebrate together

2 It is all yours, but it is also all mine

What I really, really love about this book is the message that it brings. That only when everyone comes together, and sees that the Earth is “all yours, but it is also all mine” can we look after it properly. The dinosaurs believe the Earth shouldn’t be owned. It shouldn’t have “parts of it [belonging] to certain people”. Maybe if we shared one world, we wouldn’t have people fighting over different parts of it.

Man looking up at a star

3 The pictures help you feel the words

The pictures are made in a lovely watercolour style, which I think is beautiful. Though it’s not just the style that makes them interesting. I love how they reflect the mood of the writing. When the man gets to the “star” and finds nothing there, the picture shows mostly the vast emptiness of space. And when the man is looking at the star, the pictures are equally quite empty. It’s just him. Whereas the dinosaurs are usually seen together. Playing together. Working together. For me, it makes me feel the man’s loneliness. Maybe he wanted to go to the star in the hope he wouldn’t be alone.

A very large dinosaur with a long neck talks to a man in a spacesuit

4 It explains the impact we have on the environment

There are plenty of books on planes and trains for children, but very few explain the impact of making them.  And although technology is fantastic, we don’t often see how we could be causing harm.  I think this is really important for children to learn.  Things don’t just appear out of nowhere. They are made from other things, and often have a cost. Especially in this day and age I think it is very important we know the environmental impact humans have on the environment.

Illustration of a man gleefully getting out of his rocket to find a world full of grass, plants and flowers

5 That if you focus too much on one thing you can lose sight of everything else

In the case of this book it’s literal, as the more the man focuses on the star the more he can’t actually see the Earth. Like the man in the book we can become so focused on one thing that we lose sight of everything else. Sometimes it’s a good thing to just sit and notice everything going on around you. Hopefully enjoying the flowers on the way.

Front cover shows two green dinosaurs happily jumping on a pile of cars

I hope you liked my review of this book and it’s made you want to sit down and read it. I think it has such an important message, which is important for all of us. Let out that inner dinosaur!

Additional learning
While reading the book
  • You could count all the animals in the book. How many dinosaurs are there? How many birds?
  • You could discuss why you think the man wanted to go the star.
Extra Learning
Science and Technology
  • You could draw a rocket. Or even better make one. All you’ll need is an empty kitchen roll, some bits of coloured paper and glue or sellotape. You could even make it fly by getting a foot pump like this or attaching it to a balloon and a long piece of string like this.
  • You could take your child to a Science Museum (the one in London has a very good space exhibition) to learn more about planets and space.
  • If they like the dinosaurs you could teach them about all the different types of dinosaurs that there were. See if they can spot them in the book.
  • This one is just because of the scientist in me but one thing I don’t quite like about the book is that it mistakes a moon for a star. You could explain the difference that our moon is a rock that travels around a planet, while a star, like the sun, is a giant ball of burning gas.
Outside Activities
  • You could go to a Botanical Garden or Park where they have all sorts of different species of trees and flowers. A lot of them run activities for children too, which helps them learn as well as keeping them entertained.
English
  • If your children can write, they could write the story from the dinosaurs point of view.
Art
  • You could draw a picture of the world when it is polluted and one where the dinosaurs have made it beautiful again.
  • Better yet, make a collage! You could use bits of rubbish to make a picture of the rubbish heap and bits of leaves and flowers to make one of the natural world.
Well-being
  • Say all the things you are thankful for, whether it’s flowers or cups of tea. It’ll make you feel better and is a great thing to do when your child, or you, is feeling down.
  • Spend some time in nature. Take a walk with your child and just enjoy the fresh air. I’m sure they’ll enjoy the sticks and puddles quite a bit.